Tag Archives: strikers

How to scout a striker?

Scouting strikers should not be that hard, right? Their prime responsibility is putting the ball in the back of the net, and goals are one of the few elements of football where traditional fans and nerdy analysts agree. A goal is a goal, counting goals cannot go wrong. Strikers who score a lot of goals are better than strikers that score less goals. Or not?

In our previous piece on scouting offensive talent, we’ve distinguished two elements that constitute a good striker.

  1. The striker has to get into good scoring positions, and accumulate good shots. This is best measured as Expected Goals (ExpG) per 90 minutes, with exclusion of penalties.
  2. The striker has to convert these chances into goals. This can be measured by comparing ExpG and actual non penalty goals.

The previous post on strikers illustrated how we can measure those two elements and judge strikers separately on both of these qualities. Today we will take it a step further and see what scouting implications come from it. We will show that sometimes it is better to buy a lower scoring striker, and which high scoring strikers to avoid. But first, I want you to meet someone.
 

Meet our striker!

He plays in a big league, for a good team, where he has taken 160 non penalty shots in the past season. On average, each shot was good for 0.152 ExpG, so over all shots together we could have expected 24.4 goals from him.

The thing is, our striker is pretty good, so instead of 24.4, he scored 43 non penalty goals for an over performance of 18.6 goals. We can stick an ugly acronym to it and say his non penalty goals above replacement (NPGAR) is 18.6.

NPGAR = Non Penalty Goals – Expected Non Penalty Goals

You’ve probably guessed by now that our striker is Lionel Messi. This season, Messi still plays for Barcelona, where he has taken 75 non penalty shots to date. On average the quality of the chances was comparable to last season, with an ExpG per shot of 0.149. Overall, we should expect 11.1 goals.

The thing is, Messi is suddenly not so excellent at finishing, and he has come up with 9 non penalty goals instead of 11. His NPGAR is now -2.14, which indicates that the average player, not even the average striker, would have scored two more goals with the type and number of shots that Messi has taken this season.

 

Analysis

A story about Messi is not analysis, it’s anecdote. And anecdotal evidence is no evidence. We could ‘prove’ that finishing does stick with a player by simply picking someone else that happened to follow an excellent finishing season with another excellent finishing season and fire that point home.

It makes more sense to repeat this work for all 479 players of the top-5 leagues who took at least 10 non penalty shots in the baseline 2012/13 season. We take separate looks at the creation of goal scoring chances (ExpG per 90) and at the conversion of chances into goals (Goals minus ExpG). Both parameters will be compared over one season and the next.

 

ExpG per 90

In the first graph we will look at the repeatability of non penalty Expected Goals per 90 minutes (ExpG NP per90). The horizontal axis shows ExpG NP per 90 for the first season, and the vertical axis shows the same for the next season.

ExpG90 correlationExcellent! It turns out that players with a high ExpG per 90 in one season, are also the players with a high ExpG per 90 in the next season. This is not too surprising, as several factors influencing ExpG per 90 will remain constant over time. Strikers will still be playing as strikers, and most players playing for top team will still be playing for top teams. More work needed here, but we’ll leave that for another post, as there is a far more interesting graph coming up.

 

NPGAR

The next graph shows the repeatability of non penalty goals above replacement (NPGAR). This represents the conversion of goal scoring chances into actual goals.

NPGAR correlationIt turns out that if you correct for the quality of goal scoring attempts, there is absolutely no connection between conversion in one season and the next. A high or low NPGAR in one season has zero relation with NPGAR in the next season.

Messi is the dot in the lower right hand corner, who had an unworldly 2012/13 season, with an NPGAR of +18.6, followed by the current season of -2.1.

 

Scouting

This is a shocking conclusion with huge implications for striker scouting. If a striker bases his goal scoring mainly on conversion, he has a good chance to fail in the next season. If a striker bases his goal scoring mainly on good underlying ExpG numbers, he has a good chance to persist his level of scoring.

Buying strikers who score their goals due to a high NPGAR is something you should always avoid.

We all know these famous examples of one season wonders, who got transferred for big money, only to disappoint at their new clubs. Usually, loads of soft factors like the higher level of competition, language issues, or playing style are used to explain the disappointing results, while the only thing going on is regression of NPGAR.

Regression does not always occur though, and you can see in the scatter plot that some players do indeed follow a season of high NPGAR with another season with high NPGAR. But just as many players do not, and just as many players with high NPGAR in the second season come off seasons with low NPGAR.

 

Finnbogason

We should use NPGAR as a red flag in striker scouting. A player like Alfred Finnbogason, currently the Eredivisie top scorer with 21 goals in 20 matches, is a nice example. We can put up several red flags.

First, 8 of his 21 goals are penalties. Second, his NPGAR is +2.68, indicating that he is nearly three non penalty goals above expectations. There is no ground at all to assume that he, or any other player, will outperform the ExpG model  next year. All in all, Finnbogason’s non penalty ExpG per 90 is 0.51, which is still a good number, but by no means near the present perception of a striker that scores 1.05 goals per 90.

For next season, 0.51 goals per 90 seems a reasonable estimate. The problem is, next season Finnbogason will not be playing at Heerenveen, as he will make the step up to a bigger league, where he won’t contribute the same number as in the Eredivisie. His true level should then be estimated somewhat lower than  0.51 goals per 90 minutes, and we will all start wondering what is going on with all these high scoring strikers who just don’t cut it outside the Eredivisie.

 

Exceptions

Inevitably, though, there will be players who seems to disprove the workings of NPGAR. We can assume that half of all players will have a positive NPGAR and half will have a negative NPGAR. A season later, one quarter of players will have two consecutive positive NPGAR seasons. One eighth will have three consecutive seasons where they outperform ExpG, and so on.

In this study among players from top-5 leagues with at least 10 shots, we find 479 players. With such a big group of players, there will inevitably be some players who consistently outperform ExpG to produce season after season of positive NPGAR. This is a misleading situation, as these players will be credited with finishing skills that are basically the product of an unrepeatable effort.

 

In the end

The message in striker scouting is quite clear. Familiarize yourself with the terms ExpG and NPGAR and these mistakes of flopping striker are generally avoidable. Stay away from strikers with high NPGAR and aim for those with high ExpG numbers, as the latter group will cut it next season, while the first group has every chance of falling back.

Probably, a negative NPGAR in a player with good underlying ExpG numbers is a sign of a bargain buy. The world will see a striker struggling to convert, and it takes some balls to buy him, but the numbers indicate that a return to scoring form is right around the corner.